allllure:

You go autocorrect.

blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome. blueandbluer:


Female Captain America cosplayers. 
Found here. 

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome.

blueandbluer:

Female Captain America cosplayers.

Found here.

So many awesome LadyCaps.

SO much awesome.

(Source: sassycaptrogers)

The Palinode shares several mysterious, dystopian mini stories.

medievalpoc:

tobinlaughing:

medievalpoc:

Lippo Memmi
Madonna and Child With Saints and Angels
Italy (c. 1350)
This painting is an example of Mongolian influence on art in Medieval Europe. The intricate gold figures on the hem of the Virgin Mary’s robes is actually Phags-pa Mongol script. This practice of using Mongol script in European Medieval art went unnoticed until Japanese scholar Hidemichi Tanaka published his findings…in 1983.
A related phenomenon is the use of Pseudo-Kufic (nonsense letters that look like Arabic to Europeans) script often used in similar artworks. The purpose appears to have been to make the cloth seem extremely fine-the best and most expensive cloth known to Europeans at the time all came from the Islamic nations of the Middle East, and nations farther east like China. The Mongolian invasion of Europe also had the effect of bringing trade in this kind of fine cloth with it-as well as the script used to decorate clothing in paintings like this one.
[x] [x] [x] [x]

When I was doing my part to write the Persia section of our class-textbook for The History of Eastern Dress, I ran across this concept and presented it to the class on a day when the instructor asked us to think about Orientalism. And despite the tone of the semester overall—to think about how Eurocentric our study of theatrical history is, to investigate other cultures and their histories (most of which stretched much further back than any of our own), and to discover the whys of things like Orientalism, conspicuous consumption, and imitation as a form of intimidation—despite all that, there was a lot of resistance from my classmates as far as accepting the idea. Mostly the attitude was, “sure, that’s a nice idea, but why would white folks need stuff like that?”

I’ve had really similar experiences, and I’ll just say what a lot of people think of as “going with the flow” is really just adherence to dominant cultural narratives, and active resistance to questioning a worldview more comfortable to some people than others.  :| I’m making a guess on the demographics of the class based on how you’re talking here (“most of which stretched further back than any of our own”), and that would definitely play into the social dynamics of the learning environment, and attitudes toward Othering.
That’s the thing…I think a lot of people assume this is just about a need for more education, rather than questioning our attitudes about critical thinking and active engagement with the way we learn. medievalpoc:

tobinlaughing:

medievalpoc:

Lippo Memmi
Madonna and Child With Saints and Angels
Italy (c. 1350)
This painting is an example of Mongolian influence on art in Medieval Europe. The intricate gold figures on the hem of the Virgin Mary’s robes is actually Phags-pa Mongol script. This practice of using Mongol script in European Medieval art went unnoticed until Japanese scholar Hidemichi Tanaka published his findings…in 1983.
A related phenomenon is the use of Pseudo-Kufic (nonsense letters that look like Arabic to Europeans) script often used in similar artworks. The purpose appears to have been to make the cloth seem extremely fine-the best and most expensive cloth known to Europeans at the time all came from the Islamic nations of the Middle East, and nations farther east like China. The Mongolian invasion of Europe also had the effect of bringing trade in this kind of fine cloth with it-as well as the script used to decorate clothing in paintings like this one.
[x] [x] [x] [x]

When I was doing my part to write the Persia section of our class-textbook for The History of Eastern Dress, I ran across this concept and presented it to the class on a day when the instructor asked us to think about Orientalism. And despite the tone of the semester overall—to think about how Eurocentric our study of theatrical history is, to investigate other cultures and their histories (most of which stretched much further back than any of our own), and to discover the whys of things like Orientalism, conspicuous consumption, and imitation as a form of intimidation—despite all that, there was a lot of resistance from my classmates as far as accepting the idea. Mostly the attitude was, “sure, that’s a nice idea, but why would white folks need stuff like that?”

I’ve had really similar experiences, and I’ll just say what a lot of people think of as “going with the flow” is really just adherence to dominant cultural narratives, and active resistance to questioning a worldview more comfortable to some people than others.  :| I’m making a guess on the demographics of the class based on how you’re talking here (“most of which stretched further back than any of our own”), and that would definitely play into the social dynamics of the learning environment, and attitudes toward Othering.
That’s the thing…I think a lot of people assume this is just about a need for more education, rather than questioning our attitudes about critical thinking and active engagement with the way we learn.

medievalpoc:

tobinlaughing:

medievalpoc:

Lippo Memmi

Madonna and Child With Saints and Angels

Italy (c. 1350)

This painting is an example of Mongolian influence on art in Medieval Europe. The intricate gold figures on the hem of the Virgin Mary’s robes is actually Phags-pa Mongol script. This practice of using Mongol script in European Medieval art went unnoticed until Japanese scholar Hidemichi Tanaka published his findings…in 1983.

A related phenomenon is the use of Pseudo-Kufic (nonsense letters that look like Arabic to Europeans) script often used in similar artworks. The purpose appears to have been to make the cloth seem extremely fine-the best and most expensive cloth known to Europeans at the time all came from the Islamic nations of the Middle East, and nations farther east like China. The Mongolian invasion of Europe also had the effect of bringing trade in this kind of fine cloth with it-as well as the script used to decorate clothing in paintings like this one.

[x] [x] [x] [x]

When I was doing my part to write the Persia section of our class-textbook for The History of Eastern Dress, I ran across this concept and presented it to the class on a day when the instructor asked us to think about Orientalism. And despite the tone of the semester overall—to think about how Eurocentric our study of theatrical history is, to investigate other cultures and their histories (most of which stretched much further back than any of our own), and to discover the whys of things like Orientalism, conspicuous consumption, and imitation as a form of intimidation—despite all that, there was a lot of resistance from my classmates as far as accepting the idea. Mostly the attitude was, “sure, that’s a nice idea, but why would white folks need stuff like that?”

I’ve had really similar experiences, and I’ll just say what a lot of people think of as “going with the flow” is really just adherence to dominant cultural narratives, and active resistance to questioning a worldview more comfortable to some people than others.  :| I’m making a guess on the demographics of the class based on how you’re talking here (“most of which stretched further back than any of our own”), and that would definitely play into the social dynamics of the learning environment, and attitudes toward Othering.

That’s the thing…I think a lot of people assume this is just about a need for more education, rather than questioning our attitudes about critical thinking and active engagement with the way we learn.

g0ggles:

I think this is the most concise summary of privilege I’ve seen yet

It’s not always obvious, is it?

antoinetriplett:

jolivet:

spaceman-v-spiff:

nescientes:

novacayyn:

carry-on-my-otp:

If Stuntmen from the old movies don’t have your full respect then I just don’t know what to say to you

l tried really hard not to reblog this

Yeah, it is indeed really hard not to reblog a fucking thing.

Can we all agree that the man in the first gif is the manliest man in the world?

Are we just going to all silently acknowledge that the last guy is clearly dead and that we just saw him die. 

HOLD UP FOR A SECOND

ALL OF THESE GIFS ARE ONE MAN

THE SINGULAR BUSTER KEATON

WHILE FILMING THE GENERAL

HE SNAPPED HIS NECK ON THE RAILROAD TIES AND WENT HOME AND ICED HIS BODY

AND CAME BACK FOR WORK THE NEXT DAY

HE ONCE GOT HIS HIP RIPPED OUT OF ITS SOCKET BY A MALFUNCTIONING ELEVATOR AND WAS DISAPPOINTED WITH HIMSELF FOR BEING INJURED

HE ONCE HAD TO FALL 100 FEET DOWN A WATERFALL INTO A NET

A STUNTMAN TESTED IT AND BROKE BOTH LEGS AND DISLOCATED HIS SHOULDER

BUSTER DID THE STUNT ANYWAY AND LANDED WITHOUT A SCRATCH

IN ‘THE HIGH DIVE’

BUSTER DID A TRICK DIVE THROUGH A CARDBOARD DECK THAT WAS CAMOUFLAGED TO LOOK LIKE THE REAL DECK

ONLY HE COULDN’T TELL FROM 100 FEET UP WHERE THE CARDBOARD STOPPED AND THE REAL DECK STARTED AND THERE WAS ONLY LIKE A THREE FOOT MARGIN FOR ERROR

AND WHEN HE HESITATED A SUDDEN BREEZE LITERALLY KNOCKED HIM OFF THE DIVING BOARD AND HE HAD TO JUMP ANYWAY

AND HE MISSED THE REAL DECK BY LESS THAN A FOOT BUT HE MADE IT

IN THE SECOND GIF HE’S RECREATING SOMETHING THAT THE ACTUAL GENERAL PURSUERS HAD TO DO IN THE CIVIL WAR

IF HE MISSES THAT TIE

THE TRAIN WILL BE DERAILED AND HE WILL DIE IN THE EXPLOSION

IN THE THIRD GIF AN ENTIRE HOUSE IS FALLING HE HAS ONE TAKE AND IF HE HAS NOT DONE THE CALCULATIONS CORRECTLY HE WILL BE CRUSHED

HE HAS AN INCH-WIDE MARGIN ON EACH SIDE

AND THE HOUSE LITERALLY BRUSHES HIS LEFT SHOULDER ON THE WAY DOWN

YOU CAN SEE HIS LEFT ARM JUMP BECAUSE HE’S FLINCHING FROM THE PAIN

THAT LAST GIF

HE WAS SUPPOSED TO MAKE THAT JUMP

HE WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO FALL AND THEY HADNT PLANNED FOR IT

BUT HE SURVIVED

BUSTER KEATON SURVIVED 100% OF THINGS THAT WOULD HAVE KILLED LESSER MEN INCLUDING WWI, TORNADOS, HOUSEFIRES, ALCOHOLISM, BROKEN NETS, CRUSHING DEPRESSION, THE DEPRESSION ITSELF, THE MCCARTHY WITCHHUNTS, THE END OF SILENT CINEMA, AND ABOUT 900 MORE OF THE STUNTS YOU SEE ABOVE

BUSTER LIVED TO BE 70 YEARS OLD

FATHERED LIKE FOUR KIDS AND EIGHT GRANDKIDS

HE CAME OUT THE OTHER SIDE OF ALL THAT

THINKING THAT LIFE WAS GOOD AND PEOPLE WERE WONDERFUL

BUSTER KEATON IS NOT JUST A STUNTMAN

HE IS A GODDAMN SAINT

angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/
angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
2. Times Square, 1947
3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945
7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935
See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/

angelclark:

Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color

1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918

2. Times Square, 1947

3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862

4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957

5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)

6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945

7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942

8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919

9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942

10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935

See the rest here: http://noarmycanstopanidea.com/20-historic-black-and-white-pictures-restored-in-color/

blueandbluer:

theslipperiestbutt:

theslipperiestbutt:

alyssabethancourt:

kate-wisehart:

inkyubus:

alyssabethancourt:

kissmyasajj:

hiorioh:

ozthenekomaster:

This is not an exaggeration.  I’ve burned my hands before while touching a steering wheel.

I’ve also burned my legs while in the process of putting on my seat belt and having the metal clasp accidentally graze my leg.

Also, it hurts sitting on the seat.  It hurts 10x more when the seats are leather.

Driving in a car in AZ during the summer is very painful.

100% accurate

In the summer we often get in the car, turn on the ac and wait for 5 min before driving because the steering wheel is too hot to touch

But don’t crank you AC immediately, cause that’s like a hot oven right in your face. And NEVER leave your sunglasses in the car…

Or books. The glue in the spine will melt right out.

is it too hot for windshield covers? wouldn’t those help a little?

Today’s high for the beginning of May in Phoenix is 95 degrees Fahrenheit. The average July heat in Phoenix is 106 degrees F. That’s AVERAGE — meaning that any given day in Phoenix it might be hotter than that. Last year in Phoenix it got up to 119 degrees F. The hottest day on record in Phoenix since records began was 122 degrees F.

In short, windshield covers won’t really help but for a couple of degrees, especially seeing as a lot of the heat accumulates at night — during which windshield covers won’t help a damn bit.

When King of the Hill said that Phoenix’s existence was a monument to man’s arrogance, they were not fucking around.

Ahahahahahaha. Windshield covers.

That’s adorable.

In the summer, the interior of a sealed car will reach 200 degrees F. I don’t think the 5-10 degrees you might shave off of that with windshield covers really make that a whole lot more bearable. If you leave a water bottle in the car and try to drink from it when you come back after a couple of hours, you can literally scald your esophagus. People have suffered third degree burns from the metal fittings on their seat belts. Children and pets die every year from being left in the car for less than five minutes. Places like Phoenix are the reason why air-conditioned footwells are a feature in cars.

Everything Tasha says above is true, except for one addendum. The officially recorded temperatures for Phoenix are taken at Sky Harbor International Airport; the temperatures in other areas of the metropolitan area, which is sprawling and vast, vary by several degrees on any given day. In other words, it has been hotter than 122 without making it onto the record. From practical experience, though the mathematical average July temperature may be 106, the actual usual temperature on a July day is between 112 and 118. And no matter what you might have heard some ignoramus say, all hot is not created equal.

As a thought exercise for those who live in a more temperature climate, contemplate a temperature that is a very hot summer day in your personal experience. Let’s just say that’s 95. Now think about what you know the difference is between the feeling of 95 and 72 degrees. That’s a difference of the same number of degrees as 95 and 118. At the other end, think about the difference between 40 and 17. If you’ve ever felt them both, you know they’re different animals. Even breathing becomes a different kind of activity. It’s the same in extreme heat. You can feel your lungs searing.

Getting into a hot car in the summer is an acquired skill that you have to learn young, or else you can seriously hurt yourself. You can’t just get in and close the doors and blast the air. You have to leave the doors open for a moment to let the accumulated oven-temperature air dissipate. You have to carefully maneuver yourself into your seat without touching any of the metal bits or hard plastic inside the car, which is especially rough if you’re wearing shorts (and you probably are.) You have to keep the air turned low (if you forgot to turn it down before you turned the car off, you’re in for the truly unpleasant experience of getting blasted in the face with a blowdryer while you’re already boiling to death and probably also dehydrated and/or sunburned) until the system kicks in and starts blowing cool air. Then you close the doors and suffer for a while until the cool air actually starts to fill the cab, at which time you’re still miserable because you’re drenched in sweat and now the a/c is making you shiver, but you can’t turn it down because there is no middle ground. If you’re not actively battling the heat, it wins. Then you very gingerly try to handle the seatbelt without burning yourself on the aforementioned metal bits, and brace yourself to have to grip the gear shift and the steering wheel hard enough to get the car moving, which you know is going to hurt but you have to do it anyway. You may even start to burn off your fingerprints in places before summer is over. That’s why people here learn to drive with two fingertips, and why the oven mitts are a completely reasonable idea and not even a joke.

By the time the interior temperature of the car has become tolerable, you’ve probably reached your destination and it’s time to step out into the sun again, knowing that your car will be baking behind you as you conduct your business.

What I’m saying here is, I will go all reactionary ragebeast when I hear people imply that the heat in Phoenix can’t be as bad as people say it is.

And don’t even with the "But it’s a dry heat!"  I will cut you.

I think dry heat is worse for your health and safety than wet heat. Still, I will take the dry heat in Dubai over the wet heat in Mumbai any day. 

The temperature can go up to 60C (about 140F) here during summer. It’s more common than people think, summers have been getting hotter and hotter, especially when you go further away from the coast. I’ve never experienced anything like this though, damn. D: 

We DO leave the windows open for a few minutes before putting on the seatbelt or switching the AC on, but that’s..pretty much it. We don’t leave any food or drinks in the car EVER. If we happen to forget it in there we just throw it out. 

It’s not like this all year round though, the winters are pretty pleasant. In between summer and winter it gets unpleasantly sticky though. No, it is not autumn. It’s just sticky summer. 

I feel like..idk D: Maybe your cars are built differently? Different materials, maybe? Because getting into cars is not that big a hassle here. The metal thingo hasn’t ever been hot enough to burn. Like it is freaking hot, but…idk. Maybe its so ingrained that I’ve never even thought about these things. Steering wheels FOR SURE are not so hot that they require protective wear at least in the Merc or Toyota. 

Okay I was just discussing this with my family and I mentioned that the ac blast wasn’t THAT hot and now I don’t think I should give my opinion because I am apparently an abnormal person with crazy heat tolerance. They can’t even shower during the day and here I am putting the heater on in summer because “its soo gross and warm

Memories, yagathai?

I spent a Summer in Phoenix. Yeah. Freakin’ hot.

(Source: slidealongside)

nosleeptilbushwick:

I want a marriage like this.

(Source: awkwardlyobnoxious)